Antalis highlights sustainability scorecard for packaging

Antalis Packaging’s UK business recently launched its Green Star System and Green Card to help customers more easily identify sustainable packaging.

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Antalis Packaging’s UK business recently launched its Green Star System and Green Card to help customers more easily identify sustainable packaging.

The initiative was introduced in several European markets at the end of last year. It followed a 2021 IFOP survey among Antalis customers in Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland and the UK. The study revealed customers’ CSR commitment, particularly in the areas of packaging, where the impact on the environment makes it a major issue for companies. According to the survey, environmental friendliness is the third most important consideration when buying packaging. Circular economy, carbon footprint and product origin are also factors.

The Green Star System for packaging is a rating system grounded in a strict set of criteria, including recycled and bio-sourced material, and technical recyclability. Antalis Packaging’s aim is that, by 2025, 100% of its own brand Master’in products and 50% of suppliers’ packaging products have an environmental rating.

Meanwhile, Green Card is an information concept that provides customers with in-depth environmental product information.

“Designed and validated by certified environmental experts, these two initiatives provide comprehensive information on environmental products and encourage Antalis’ customers to select the best eco-friendly packaging solutions,” the company stated.

John Garner, Antalis Packaging’s Head of Sustainability, Innovation and Design, added: “We’re committed to meeting our customers’ needs in terms of sustainable development, particularly with regard to their high expectations on the transition to an efficient and improved circular economy. With the launch of the Green Star System and the Green Card, we are supporting customers to make informed decisions about their choice of packaging materials.”

Corby, UK