Green Thinking 2011

    OPI Green Thinking 2011 featuring the Sustainable Office initiative, how to market green products, green dealer case studies and the real impact of paper on the environment.

    0

    To view the UK & Europe digital edition click here

    To view the US & ROW digital edition click here

    The green choice isn’t always the easy choice. This truth was further cemented in my mind when we came to select the paper on which to print this OPI Green Thinking publication. 

    We always publish OPI magazine on FSC certified paper, but we decided to investigate what other sustainable paper options were available. There were quite a few, from FSC accredited and 80% recycled paper to 100% recycled and carbon neutral paper. And not being a paper expert myself, it was hard to determine exactly what each paper type meant in terms of impact on the environment. For example, if a paper is made from recycled material, does that mean it is easily recyclable itself? Not necessarily. 

    On top of all this confusion was an added pressure: the price difference between using recycled and non-recycled paper was huge. It would have cost us an extra 30% of our printing costs to print on 100% recycled paper, and the environmental benefits were not that high. 

    I then weighed up the sustainable nature of virgin paper. As our article on paper discusses, paper is made from wood, a renewable and sustainable source if managed properly. Add this fact to the efforts of many paper companies to boost paper’s environmental credentials through investment in technology and reworked processes, and paper doesn’t seem so harmful. In the end, we determined to use FSC-accredited paper and ensure it is carbon neutral. 

    This special publication highlights many examples of organisations doing their bit to protect the environment. Some are carrying out extremely involved projects, such as Kaut-Bullinger, while others have ambitious goals of getting the entire industry on the green side. All projects to get people thinking green should be applauded. 

    We hope that you adopt some of the ideas provided by the organisations featured in this year’s issue. Yet again, we have not had a shortage of businesses coming forward to tell us about their efforts towards sustainability. We should all take time to consider the green choice, even though it might not be the cheapest or the simplest.